WELCOME

We are a collaborative group of agencies that supports families, like yours, struggling with your loved one or family members substance use.

Ko tēnei rōpū, he whakakotahitanga o ngā umanga ka tautoko i ngā whānau, pērā ki tō whānau, e raru ana i te tarukino. Ko te mana o te tangata ka whakamaua kia tīna!

 

TIME FOR CHANGE?

Breathe. You’re not alone.

Many other parents and families have gone through, and are going through, what you’re facing now.

Kia manawa tītī mai, ehara ko koe me tō kotahi. Tokomaha ngā mātua me ngā whānau kua para, kei te para rānei i tō huarahi.

WELCOME

We are a collaborative group of agencies that supports families, like yours, struggling with your loved one or family members substance use.

Ko tēnei rōpū, he whakakotahitanga o ngā umanga ka tautoko i ngā whānau, pērā ki tō whānau, e raru ana i te tarukino. Ko te mana o te tangata ka whakamaua kia tīna!

WELCOME

We are a collaborative group of agencies that supports families, like yours, struggling with your loved one or family members substance use.

Ko tēnei rōpū, he whakakotahitanga o ngā umanga ka tautoko i ngā whānau, pērā ki tō whānau, e raru ana i te tarukino. Ko te mana o te tangata ka whakamaua kia tīna!

24 HR LINE

CRISIS LINE

FREE TEXT

24 HR HELPLINE

NEED TO TALK?

0800 800 508

8681

0800 787 797

0508 272 834

SUBSTANCE ABUSE & ADDICTION

Methamphetamine is hurting our people, our whānau and our communities. Also known as Meth, P, Ice, Pure, Speed and Crack, methamphetamine is being used by all kinds of people in the Western Bay of Plenty. Drug abuse is serious and can affect relationships, physical and mental health and finances.

If you are using meth or you see the harm meth is doing to someone you care for and love, then now is the time to make a change. There are many people within our community ready to help you.

To find out more about the range of help options available, and confidential advice and support, check out the Service Provider page.

The Service Provider page lists a range of local services and national helplines, all experienced in the harm meth is causing. All providers will offer treatment options to help you and your whanau, in a friendly, non-judgmental, professional way. Act now if you are worried, this website is a great starting point.  You may want to contact just one provider, or try different services to find what works best for you. There’s also information for your family, whānau, or friends if they need advice and support.

 

This website has been developed by The Breakthrough Forum, a group of organisations in the Western Bay of Plenty who are working together to develop healthier communities. The purpose of the Forum is to raise awareness on methamphetamine (and other substances) to prevent and reduce whānau and community harm.We are ready to help and support families, whānau and communities that are being hurt by meth.

For confidential, local help phone the BOP DHB 24 hour helpline on 0800 800 508. For national help call the Alcohol and Drug helpline: 0800 787 797 or text 8681 (free, 24 hours a day, any day).

If you are concerned for a loved one’s safety, call 111 immediately.

LOOKING FOR A SERVICE PROVIDER?

FAQ’s

Frequently asked questions.

How Is Methamphetamine Used?

Methamphetamine can be:

  • Snorted
  • Ingested
  • Smoked
  • Injected

The route of administration affects the intensity and duration of the high. Smoking and injecting produce an almost immediate high and a “rush”; while snorting meth results in a high a few minutes later and ingesting (swallowing) the drug results in intoxication about 20 minutes later. Meth is most commonly smoked.

What Are The Withdrawal Symptoms of Methamphetamine?

Regular users who suddenly stop taking methamphetamine will experience withdrawal symptoms. Meth withdrawal symptoms begin about a day after last use and last with severity for between 7 and 10 days, and last with gradually subsiding intensity for a further 2 weeks or so.

The primary symptoms of methamphetamine withdrawal are:

  • Fatigue
  • Excessive sleeping
  • Hunger
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Anxiety
  • Drug cravings

MYTHS

Common misconceptions.

People get addicted to meth instantly

You’ve seen the ads: “Meth—not even once.” At the baseline level, we all know that if you don’t start a drug, you won’t get addicted. It’s a total impossibility.

However, the actual time it takes to become addicted to meth varies by the user. Some get hooked quickly, and some use for years without getting addicted. The bottom line is this is a false statement, but it would be foolish to believe you can try meth just once, or use meth recreationally for an extended period of time.

Why? First of all, meth introduces a user to 10 times the normal amount of “dopamine,” the brain’s pleasure and happiness chemical. It’s an intense, long-lasting high, which eventually reshapes your brain to need the drug like any human necessity. Secondly, when an individual chooses to try meth, there is often an underlying reason—whether it’s because he wants to lift depression, focus, or simply reduce boredom. If the underlying issue isn’t handled properly, it’s likely a first-time user will start to rely on the drug to solve it temporarily. That’s why, at Pat Moore Foundation, we always start with a holistic plan for recovery.

Meth turns people into violent maniacs

This is false. What meth does do is inhibit sleep. Without sleep, the brain cannot flush out toxins and reset itself. So people who continue to use meth over three or more consecutive nights without sleep can experience the negative psychological effects of sleep deprivation such as hallucinations, erratic or agitated behaviour, or even psychosis.

 

 

 

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